A Blender and a Paperback Book

August 17, 2013

I had a dream last month that I was back in college. In this dream I was hanging out with Jason Poenitske, my roommate for most of my college career at Western Kentucky University in Bowling Green. In the dream, I was having trouble finding our room. Once I did, Jason already had things setup. He had two small tube televisions setup, one mounted on a stand hanging from the wall in a corner over his bed, and a bigger tube set shared more with the room. I came into the room, assessed it, and said to Jason that all I’d need was my desk.

I’m not exactly sure which desk I was referring to. The desk I work on now is much bigger than the room; much bigger than the ones I had in any of the dorm rooms we lived in, be that Barnes-Campbell, or what was then named the New Coed Dorm. However, I also didn’t have all of the computer equipment I have now. No work laptop. No Mac. No monitors. No Printer. Not really even a phone, much less a cell phone. I did have a stereo boom-box with a cd player and a dozen or so CDs. Besides the small stereo boom-box, our room’s tech amounted to Jason’s small television, an original Nintendo game console, and two alarm clocks. In the dream I made the comment that there was a really big difference between technology back then, when we graduated, he in 1996 and me in 1997, as opposed to now. Not even flat screens.

I guess my dream was about how much different life is in 2013. How technology has changed life in certain ways. How little we needed back then as opposed to what we think we can’t live without now. A few days ago my wife and I were talking about how little television either of us watched when we were in school. I remember watching maybe a few hours of tv a week, tops. Most of that was probably Star Trek, Golf, or music videos back when MTV actually played music videos.

BLENDERANDAPAPERBACKBOOK

Now that I think about it, that scenario is a lot like when we go on vacation. We put our gadgets in the room safe until we’re ready to leave and we never turn on the tv. The most high tech devices we see all week would probably be a blender and a paperback book.

Owen

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